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OFF THE WALL

Haddon Hall remained empty and abandoned for some two hundred years, between 1700 and the 1920s, whereupon the 9th Duke and Duchess of Rutland restored the property, all of the rooms, and the surrounding gardens. The house, situated in the Peak District National Park, in Derbyshire, managed to survive civil and world wars, fires, and the effects of abandonment to the elements. In what is often described as “the most perfect house to survive from the Middle Ages,” Haddon Hall has also been the set for many films, including Elizabeth, Pride & Prejudice, The Other Boleyn Girl and The Princess Bride. During its long and careful restoration, each pane of glass was removed, cleaned, and releaded. Any stonework that has had to be replaced is made of the local Derbyshire stone.

Above, left to right: Colefax and Fowler Swedish Tree, Cowtan & Tout, collar is Closet Stripe by Farrow & Ball, belt is antique grosgrain ribbon from VV Rouleaux. The two-strap dress is Featherfest by Schumacher. The ankle-high garment is Scrolling Fern Silhouette by Soane on an antique mannequin from Kate Thurlow Antiques. The knee-length dress is La Folie Du Jour, Pierre Frey. Sea Feather Large from Min Hogg on an antique mannequin from Katharine Pole Antiques; the antique child mannequin is from Kate Thurlow Antiques with a dress made of Ludo wallpaper by Schumacher; the fabric covering the mannequin is Greenbrier II linen by Nicky Haslam Design; Little Lotus by Galbraith & Paul is beside; the geometric print dress is Delano by Cole & Son.

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY SIMON BROWN

PRODUCED BY KATRIN CARGILL

WRITTEN BY DAVID MASELLO

 

This story appeared in the Winter 2018 issue of MILIEU.